In a post earlier this year, I posted information about Google’s Arts and Culture,  so I was very interested when  Museum Computer Network members started to evaluate the platform.  One of my colleagues mentioned Megan’s paper so I’ve featured it here. In December 2020, I came across an earlier post where Canada’s national artist organization, CARFAC, posted their concerns about Google Projector and Google Selfie features.  CARFAC points out the features and risks of these applications because of the level of resolution available to culture consumers.  They also mention that some museums that are participating in Google Art and Culture have not arranged sublicenses with artist when their work is featured.
  In Megan K. Udell‘s research paper,  her  abstract states that this Google platform “tends to favor institutions with more staff time to spend on their virtual presence. By analyzing Google Arts and Culture within the context of larger museum trends in virtuality and interviewing museum professionals responsible for their institutions’ virtual presence” … This project proposes several ways Google Arts and Culture can change their collaboration protocol better serve museums and go beyond merely providing access to their technologies.”  

Post Author: Victoria Stasiuk